Category: Web 2.0

Is it still a blog if the comments are off?

Amber Bouman on Engadget’s one week trial of turning all comments off: But we’ve increasingly found ourselves turning off comments on stories that discuss topics of harassment, gender or race simply because so many of the replies are hateful, even threatening. Articles that mention Apple deteriorate into arguments of iOS vs Android, replete with grade-school name calling. Articles that don’t make mention of Samsung often include comments claiming that we are shills for Apple. Some commenters plain attack our writers or editors or other commenters. Some are outright threats. And that’s not even getting into the spam problem. The thing

Continue reading

The modern day grind of a blog writer

TechCrunch’s John Biggs on what he has learned after writing 11,00 blog posts. There’s a lot here that I can relate to: Nobody cares. Nobody will read you. The only way to make them care is to keep doing it, day after day. Write 1,000 words a day. Don’t stop. This holds true in everything. Can you write more words per day? You can, but start at 1,000. Once you do that, day after day, people will notice. Then people will read. Then people will come back. Then you’ll gain a following. You probably won’t make any money but you

Continue reading

Kickstarter lessons from the failed Zano drone project

Crowdsourcing is still a ‘big thing’ that many people are relying on. Which means when crowd funding goes wrong it can have a big impact. For those of you following the funding merry-go-round the name of Zano will be familiar. If you haven’t heard, it was a semi-autonomous drone that you would control from your smartphone and it would follow you, avoid obstacles, and record HD video. It was a spectacular failure, burning through funds, promises, and delivery goals. Kickstarter commissioned Mark Harris to write an investigative report into the failure. It’s chock full of lessons for people running crowd funding

Continue reading

The reality of living from YouTube earnings

It’s hard. Really hard. Unless you can get right to the top of the pile, it’s going to be incredibly difficult to live from social media video views. At least that’s the viewpoint of Gaby Dunn in a sobering article on the business of vlogging: I’m 27 years old and have been building an online following for 10 years, beginning with a popular Livejournal I wrote in high school. A couple of years ago, after moving to Los Angeles, I made the transition from freelance writing to creating online video. The channel I have with my best friend Allison Raskin,

Continue reading

Windows Live Writer lives again

Really glad to read that Microsoft’s Windows Live Writer has been open-sourced and is being maintained by a group of volunteers. I spent a huge amount of time inside WLW when I was writing on a Windows machine, and while I’ve moved over to MarsEdit on OSX in the last year, my secondary machines are running Windows 10 (mostly for my podcasting and radio software), and its great to have a solid offline blogging client for those machines as well. You can find Open Live Writer at openlivewriter.org and the code is at GitHub.

Continue reading

Ninety-nine-one is everywhere in technology

I’ve always been aware of the 90/9/1 split in terms of creating online content (ninety percent of people consume content, nine percent will interact with content, and one percent will create content) but I’ve never looked to see how it carries over into other areas of the geekerati’s world. Thankfully Charles Arthur has. What do operating systems, browsers and search engines all have in common? It seems to be a ratio of 90:9:1 between the key players. One player dominates; then others get a minimal share. Take mobile OSs: This week the Mozilla Foundation pulled the plug on Firefox OS

Continue reading