Tag: reddit

Does Reddit’s button control the horizontal or the vertical?

A button that you press to get a badge on your Reddit profile, and you get a better badge the longer you can wait… but it’s a shared button so anyone can press it: When users post messages on the /r/thebutton subreddit, a colored badge (called “flair” in Reddit-land) shows whether the user has pressed the button and if so, what time the counter showed at the time that user pressed it. If you’ve never pressed the button, you get a gray “non-presser” badge that looks like this: The color indicates how much time was left when you pressed the button

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Trivial Posts: The Debut Edition

Right then, let’s try a little something here. Since I had my ‘what is this blog for’ discussion a year or two ago, it’s been a place for links, thoughts, and fun things that I want to keep track of personally… and there seems to be an audience for it. But it’s been a bit haphazard of late. So in a vain way to try and put some structure in place, and to experiment with email newsletters and regular digests, here’s the first day of ‘Trivial Posts’. (Personally I blame James Whatley). Nine Flawed Christmas Baubles Of The Solar System Just because Pluto pretended to be a

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Graphs that explain the internet…. Buzzfeed

Todd Schneider tracks the Reddit front-page, the stories that reach it, and the stories in pages two, three, four, and beyond. Unsurprisinly (to me) the Reddit front page is far from ‘automatic’ but has a decent level of editorial control, as can be seen from the step-change in the graph showing the position of the Top 100 posts hour by hour. That got me wondering: if a post is on reddit’s second (or third, or fourth) page, what are the chances that it’ll make it to the first page? reddit shows 25 posts per page by default, and at some point I saw my

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The marketeering that is ruling Reddit

Ryan Holiday at BetaBeat, on Reddit and marketing… Unfortunately, I don’t think that’s what’s happening here. These aren’t organic accidents or real fan-to-brand interaction. It’s just fakery–there’s too much of it for that not to be the case. And what’s worse, the brands that are engaging in the stunts could easily afford to pay for the ad space on those same pages. In other words, we’re not talking about small creative marketing here–we’re talking multibillion-dollar corporations using their enormous marketing teams to overwhelm busy volunteer moderators.

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