Tag: security

Trivial Posts #25: The Amazing, The Afraid, And The A.I.s

I thought work was going to be all about the iPhone this week. In terms of popular culture it was, but I picked up success somewhere else. And in the middle of all that, I found some fun things online… these are the Trivial Posts that kept me from falling down an Apple-filled rabbit hole. Never forget you can sign up to have this posted out to you every week, subscribe to the newsletter version here. Dah dah dah dumm DUM!! “Hum the music from Star Wars. Hum the music from James Bond. Hum the music from Harry Potter. Now hum the music from any Marvel

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On Apple, security, the FBI, and positioning

Bruce Schneier writes in the Washington Post on the case for Apple to stand firm against the FBI demand it cracks open the protection on an iPhone 5C: The policy implications are complicated. The FBI wants to set a precedent that tech companies will assist law enforcement in breaking their users’ security, and the technology community is afraid that the precedent will limit what sorts of security features it can offer customers. The FBI sees this as a privacy vs. security debate, while the tech community sees it as a security vs. surveillance debate. Privacy versus security, plus security versus

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Keylogging Android by design

Samsung are working on a service that allows application ‘a’ to receive the keystrokes from application ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’, etc (reports The Verge) so that application ‘a’ can be more contextually aware and deliver better search results and improved experiences. Automatically. I can’t see an issue with that at all. I’m sure everyone will be more than happy that Android will allow data to flow to apps, to servers outside of the handset, and be analysed and recorded, with nothing more than a security pop up at install. Nobody would ever leverage that for evil…

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Still waiting for a Square chip and pin

Silicon Valley’s darling of the credit card payment industry, Square, has released another hardware iteration of their magstripe reader. European watchers will note the system still doesn’t support ‘Chip and Pin’. While it’s not a deal-breaker for me, I continue to be amazed at the lack of security for the customer in the US credit card industry. At least in the UK retailers will check the signatures match – the majority of US transactions I’ve had swipe the card, hand it back, and then ask for a signature. I await Square’s launch in territories with stronger fraud protection systems with

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You do have something to hide, you just don’t know it

Over on Wired, Moxie Marlinspike addresses the cliched question of  ‘nothing to hide, nothing to fear’ when discussing security issues. It might be focused on America, but the principles still stand, and the view is especially relevant in the current climate. If the federal government had access to every email you’ve ever written and every phone call you’ve ever made, it’s almost certain that they could find something you’ve done which violates a provision in the 27,000 pages of federal statues or 10,000 administrative regulations. You probably do have something to hide, you just don’t know it yet.

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A Boston state of mind

The night after the ‘liquid bombings’ of UK airports, we were looking to find a guest to join us on Talk 107 in Edinburgh, and I managed to get security expert and cryptologist Bruce Schneier to call in from the US. He’s spoken in the aftermath of the Boston marathon bombing, and is as sensible now as he was then. As the details about the bombings in Boston unfold, it’d be easy to be scared. It’d be easy to feel powerless and demand that our elected leaders do something — anything — to keep us safe.  It’d be easy, but

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