Tag: tv

When Silicon Meets Valley

New Yorker’s Andrew Marantz goes behind the scenes at the TV show ‘Silicon Valley’ and finds out that yet another TV sitcom is based heavily on the real work. It’s just that Silicon Valley is surprised when it gets an accurate portrayal in the media world. Dotan called his compression expert, Tsachy Weissman, an engineering professor at Stanford. “He spent hours walking me through the very dense history of lossless compression,” Dotan said. “The way I understood it, basically, was that Claude Shannon, in 1948, worked on compressing files from the top down, using coding trees, whereas David Huffman, a

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The secrets behind the greatest daytime TV show

I’m not sure if Low Culture’s detailed look at ‘Homes Under The Hammer‘ is genuine, a tongue in cheek pastiche of geek-chic fandom, a disgruntled writer given the worst SEO assignment in the world, or a mix of all three. I’m sure that it’s a fabulously inventive piece of writing: Ridiculously, it’s unlikely that any of Hammer will ever get a DVD release. I know, right? Luckily, this does have a bright side – it means the show is covered by a blanket licence agreement for music, and they can play pretty much anything they like, so the researchers like

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Writing skills lesson 27: Interviewing ‘Library Cat’

Claire White gets all the good gigs at STV.tv. This week, managing to bring life to an article about the cat that roams the shelves of Edinburgh University’s Library. Affectionately known as Library Cat, the black and white chap is allowed to roam freely in the library and has charmed staff and students, gaining nearly 6000 fans on Facebook. The cat is so well-loved that it even has its own matriculation card. A spokesperson for Edinburgh University said Library Cat was a welcomed visitor to the building and is “much loved by students and staff alike”.

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Why do writers who hate a topic get assigned that topic in the mainstream media?

Toby Hadoke addresses some issues he has with the media’s coverage of television, actors, terminology, and ultimately about the lack of respect for the profession and the art: Revelling in ignorance about the medium you write about seems bizarre – especially when such ignorance is used to recommend somebody but, with a little implicit criticism, keep them in their place at the same time (and to what end – apart from to make the journalist look clever?). Looking clever feels terrific when you’re reviewing something, and it’s fantastic if you can enliven your prose with a witty barb or sparkly

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